Managing the Lymphatic System in Hand Therapy (AHTA)

 

Canberra | Saturday 14 October 9.00am - 4.30pm

Venue: Pavilion on Northbourne, 242 Northbourne Avenue, Dickson ACT

Overview: The lymphatic system can be compromised following trauma or scar tissue, as well as surgical interventions. This one day course hosted by the AHTA will provide participants with the theoretical and practical knowledge required to competently assess the lymphatic function in the upper limb, and apply strategies to managing lymphatic flow for clients.

The course will allow therapists to develop treatment plans for clients who have difficulties managing swelling post injury, or for those clients who have developed or are at risk of developing secondary lymphoedema following an injury or surgery. The course will include practical hands on practice of interventions, including bandaging, and manual lymphatic drainage massage.

At the completion of this course, therapists will:

- Have an increased understanding of the lymphatic system and how it relates to hand and upper limb injuries
- Have an increased understanding of the assessment of lymphatic dysfunction in the hand and upper limb
- Understand the risk factors for clients with a compromised lymphatic system and how to decrease risks
- Have an understanding of the application of compression bandaging in the hand and upper limb for managing lymphoedema
- Have and understanding of the technique for massage to decrease lymph fluid from the hand and wrist
- Learn complimenting techniques for managing the lymphatic system in hand and upper limb injuries, such as taping, breathing, and compression garments.

This course is aimed at physiotherapists and occupational therapists working in the area of hand therapy who would like to learn more about managing ongoing swelling in clients following hand and upper limb injuries. No previous knowledge of the lymphatic system is required, and it is most suited for therapists who have not completed Level 1 or 2 lymphoedema training course in the past.

Click here to register via the AHTA website.

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