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Don't lose sleep over Long Service Leave!

If you employ staff in your private practice, you would be aware that an employee is entitled to long service leave after a period of working for you. Did you know that for staff employed under a Modern Award (e.g. Health Professionals and Support Services Award 2010 [MA000027]) long service leave entitlements differ in each State and Territory?

Today we would like to share with you a handy table we created to show the key features of Long Service Leave for each part of Australia (for private sector employees employed under Modern Award)*:

State Act Criteria Entitlement Link
ACT Long Service Leave Act 1976 7 years continuous service 6.0667 weeks Click here to read more
NSW Long Service Leave Act 1955  10 years continuous service 8.67 weeks Click here to read more
NT Long Service Leave Act 10 years continuous service 13 weeks Click here to read more
QLD Industrial Relations Act 2016  10 years continuous service 8.6667 weeks Click here to read more
SA Long Service Leave Act 1987 10 years continuous service 13 weeks Click here to read more
TAS Long Service Leave Act 1976 10 years continuous service 8.66 weeks Click here to read more
VIC Long Service Leave Act (1992) 10 years continuous service 8.66 weeks Click here to read more
WA Long Service Leave Act 1958 10 years continuous service 8.66 weeks Click here to read more

*Table correct at time of publishing

 

Handy Q&A reference guide:

Here are some questions to help you reflect on your understanding of long service leave.

 

Q: Can an employee claim long service leave before the minimum period?

A: Yes, under certain circumstances, a worker who has completed a minimum number of years’ service (the number varies from State) may be entitled to a long service pro-rata payment if he or she: 

  • resigns as a result of illness, incapacity, domestic or other pressing necessity; or
  • is dismissed for any reason except serious and wilful misconduct; or
  • dies.


Q: How is long service leave paid?

A: Long service leave is generally paid at the same rate as ordinary hours.

 

Q: Can an employee “cash in” long service leave?

A: In some States, yes! They can, given they have met the minimum number of years criteria. Is this the case in your State? It might be worthwhile checking that out now. How would it affect your cash flow if a staff member submitted a request to receive a lump sum payment of their long service leave (e.g. to pay for a wedding).

I hope the above helps you rest easy that you are prepared for long service leave in your practice.

Read 570 times Last modified on Tuesday, 06 February 2018 10:00

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