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Your guide to using a graphic designer

Have you ever used a graphic designer and ended up with a result that wasn’t what you had in mind? Or maybe you haven’t used a graphic designer before and are not sure how to even start that process? Here at Maida Learning, we have used graphic designers many times, and we asked our friends at JAM Media to give some insights into the things you can do as an allied health business owner to get a great outcome with graphic design.

Allied health professionals engage graphic designers for their creative skills – a new logo, business card or stationary, advertisement, brochure, social media and other marketing collateral. Sometimes design work can become a laborious task for both the client and designer.

We have a few insider tips to make your creative process as smooth as possible.

The importance of a brief – It’s easy to say, “they’re the designer, they’re paid to be creative!” – this isn’t 100% true. Designers are paid to creatively interpret information and direction gathered from a client and organise their objectives, hence the vital nature of a creative brief.

Style Guide - Specific guides around dimensions, colours, fonts, logos and images are very important – provide them at the outset, along with any files that may be of use. These rules and essential elements are all part of the design puzzle – any missing and the picture is incomplete.

Proofs and Drafts – When you receive the first design draft – don’t freak out! There is still room to move. Design is a process and sometimes revisions are required until you’re happy with the finished product. When giving feedback, remember to be as specific as possible. Simply stating that you ‘don't like it’ will not get you the best result. Try to explain what you would like changed, the specific elements that don't work and those that work well.

Examples are everything! - Sometimes showing your designer some examples of designs, fonts, colours, etc. that you like and don't like can really help articulate what you are after far greater than a narrative. Sometimes a picture really is worth a thousand words.

Designers work to make your business look the best it can and to communicate key messages to your customers. The more information you provide your designer the better the result. Enjoy the process and remember it is a process!

Written by JAM Media www.jammedia.com.au

Tags: Marketing Branding Outsourcing Graphic Design